week enders: miss u

“About week enders, I’ll give you snippets of the highs and lows of my week.”

09.12.2011 monday

– The “In the Mood for Love” tea that I drank with cheese fondue for dinner didn’t put me to sleep last Sunday night. Sorry, I was not even in that mood. My system shuts down, gala kasi nang gala!

– The Swiss adaptor didn’t adjust well with the eccentric current at the place we stayed in Paris. So, I bought a new one.

09.13.2011 tuesday

– Just because I’m back, I got 3 morning kisses.

Philippines won third-runner up from Miss Universe. Happy and proud!

Presenting, Ms Shamcey Supsup!

– There’s The Kite Runner book mystery going on.

– After dinner, I reminisced the life I had during my early days of stay in Switzerland and talked about the good-hearted people I met along the way. I feel grateful.

09.14.2011 wednesday

@perkyperps Facebook Wall: “Uhm, puwede pa kaya ako humirit? Roma? *grin* Isa itong malaking joke.”

– Finally, I’m done with my last week’s week enders! Super @___@.

– I enjoyed the last batch of fresh basil pesto from L’s garden, which I poured over my pasta for dinner last night. Pork spareribs are sweet and tasty! Busog na naman!

– And speaking of the garden, it’s been totally wiped out. You couldn’t find it anymore in Gland’s (Google) map. See it again next year.

09.15.2011 thursday

– After those hefty long walks in Paris (walked with heels on the second day, mind you), it seems to be that my legs are conditioned much better than it used to. I’ve been enjoying my jogging for two days in a row now.

– It’s been sent to everyone this morning. We are winers. Ano daw?!? *giggles*

– “Mr. Trump, if you could change one of your physical characteristics, which one would it be and why? I’m still waiting for his answer.”  Read on.

The World’s Best Cities list is worth to follow. So far, I’ve been to Paris and I admit, despite being quite disenchanted, it’s still a dream come true. If things go well, Istanbul, Barcelona and Rome will be my targets next year. If I get back home, I’ll definitely visit Bangkok, Siem Reap among others in Asia. Florence and Sydney could be interesting. It’s going to be a dream come true if I conquer Cape Town and New York. Bonne chance!

My gal liked our photo so much that she cropped me off from it and placed it as her FB profile pic. How sweet! Hehe. :b

– Next cooking assignment, it’s gonna be kare-kare. This is actually a “dry-run” cooking task, in preparation for the upcoming rendez-vous I’m about to set up. We’ve just bought stuff from the Asian store and la boucherie en France. I’m ready for the challenge in the kitchen once more.

09.16.2011 friday

– Yey, Friday! But then again, @perkyperps – “moi, relearning tolerance. haist!”

Let the tea time begin.

– I like the improved feature of Facebook and they called it Smart List. Now you can filter your news feeds according to friends group. So if I want to be entertained, I’d just go to ‘Drama Queens and Kings’ list.

In English, "Jean, the hairdresser who charges the delay of its customers" Time is gold!

– Bro’s seeking help and I replied (channeling the nerd in me):

if else statement. if B1 = 0, lock c1.

or do this:
if B1=0 or B1=””, or LEN(B1)>0, then lock c1.

i haven’t used LEN function.

– I was getting too annoyed at someone I needed something to perk me up. I didn’t like my usual coffee. Nice to find Mövenpick at the cafeteria so I bought Gruyère double cream and meringues. I got happy, in the meantime.

The silent sufferings of a newbie, I feel you, Brad. Now I smell blood.

– I just had a fascinating dinner tonight. I terribly miss Korea’s shabu-shabu or Japanese’s teppanyaki and this one’s such a great alternative! What a very nice TGIF.

La Charbonnade, it's a kind of Swiss indoor grill cuisine.

09.17.2011 saturday

– Four days of jogging in a row, I feel my legs are getting a bit tired.  One more weekend to go and I can finally switch to my jog’s regular programming.

– Happy to report that I finally cook kare-kare. Happy also to hear my dad, mom and bro over the phone. I didn’t call them, they called me! Yes.

– Mahal ko ang wikang Filipino (Tagalog), kahit gusto ko matuto mag-Pranses.  Ngunit para maintindihan ako ng nakararami, gagamitin ko ang wikang Ingles sa blog ko. Kung hindi ko man kayang pilitin ang sarili na maipahayag ang damdamin sa Tagalog, ipapaintindi ko ito sa’yo sa wika na alam mo.

In English…

I love the Filipino (Tagalog) language, even though I want to learn French. For everyone to understand, as a universal language I will use English. I must refrain from expressing in Tagalog in my blog but in case I couldn’t help it, let me translate for you then.

Read this article, How My Sons Lost Their Tagalog: Sulat kay James Soriano, interesting insights from journalist, Benjamin Pimentel.

– I’m glad that I installed instant wordpress at last. I find this tool pretty helpful so far. I’ve just got a web host and a domain name, too. The move out is getting near. I’m excited.

– AARGH.  I’m waiting for help from the Geek Council.

Parser Error Message: Could not load file or assembly ‘Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure’ or one of its dependencies. This assembly is built by a runtime newer than the currently loaded runtime and cannot be loaded.

– We had our dinner outside the house and there, a heavy gush of rain kept pouring in. I’m not a big fan of rain, but this night, the pitterpatter sound of the rain and thunderstorm reminded me of home. Anyhow, we had Brunello di Montalcino, L’s favorite, to keep us company. We got pathetically poetic.

9.18.2011 sunday

– Rainy Sunday but we still went out for jogging. Thanks to the wind last night, we got lots of walnuts from the ground. I think we took more than a kilo, so we ended up walking on the way home instead.

I'm glad to see Dai and her big belly.

– I’m under the spirit of wine. Zzzz. I went for wine tasting at Tartegnin Pays du Bon Vin and bought wines for the upcoming fiesta.

RT via the cool hunter:
Someone asked the Dalai Lama what surprises him most. This was his response.

“Man, because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; He lives as if he’s never going to die, and then he dies having never really lived”

– I’ve just found my Italian wine. It tastes like butter! Oh gee, it must be me. I’m not claiming this, but they said that my wine tasting skill is just getting better and better (not weirder).

Apprendre la Langue Française (103e partie): la conjonction–que

Source: french.about.com

The French word que, which contracts to qu’ in front of a vowel or mute h, has numerous uses and meanings. This summary includes links to detailed information on each use of que.

Comparative and superlative adverb

Il est plus grand que moi. He is taller than I.

Conjunction

Je pense que tu as raison. I think that you’re right.

Conjunctive phrases

Je l’ai fait parce que j’avais faim.  I did it because I was hungry.

Exclamative adverb

Que tu es grand !  You’re so tall!

Indefinite relative pronoun

Ce que j’aime, c’est l’aventure.  What I love is adventure.

Indirect commands

Que le bonheur vous sourie.  May happiness smile upon you.

Interrogative phrase

Est-ce que tu es prêt ?  Are you ready?

Interrogative pronoun

Que veux-tu ?  What do you want?

Negative adverb

Je n’ai que 10 euros.  I only have ten euros.

Relative pronoun

J’ai perdu le livre que tu m’as acheté.  I lost the book that you bought me.

When the French word que is used as a conjunction, it is equivalent to “that”:

Je pense qu’il a raison.I think (that) he is right.

Nous espérons que tu seras là. We hope (that) you’ll be there.

C’est dommage qu’il ne soit pas prêt. It’s too bad (that) he’s not ready.

Note that “that” is optional in English, but que cannot be omitted.

With verbs of wanting followed by que, the French structure is the same as the above, but the English translation uses an infinitive:

Il veut qu’elle aide.  He wants her to help.

J’aimerais que tu sois là. I would like (for) you to be there.

Que can be used to repeat a previously-stated conjunction (like comme, quand, or si) or conjunctive phrase:

Comme tu es là et que ton frère ne l’est pas…Since you’re here and (since) your brother isn’t…

Je lui ai téléphoné quand j’étais rentré et que j’avais fait mes devoirs. I called him when I got home and (when) I’d done my homework.

Si j’ai de l’argent et que mes parents sont d’accord, j’irai en France l’année prochaine. If I have money and (if) my parents agree, I will go to France next year.

Pour que tu comprennes la situation et que tu sois à l’aise…So that you understand the situation and (so that) you feel comfortable…

Que can begin a clause and be followed by the subjunctive, with various meanings:

Que = whether

Tu le feras, que tu le veuilles ou non.You’ll do it whether you want to or not.

Que tu viennes ou que tu ne viennes pas, ça m’est égal. Whether you come or or not, I don’t care.

Que = so that

Fais tes devoirs, qu’on puisse sortir.Do your homework so that we can go out.

Téléphone-lui, qu’il sache où nous rejoindre. Call him, so that he knows where to meet us.

Que = when

Nous venions de manger qu’il a téléphoné.We had just eaten when he called.

Je travaillais depuis seulement une heure qu’il y a eu un exercice d’évacuation. I had been working for only an hour when there was a fire drill.

Que = third person order

Qu’il pleuve !Let / May it rain!

Qu’elle me laisse tranquille ! I wish she would leave me alone!

Que can be used to emphasize oui or non:

Que oui !

     

Yes indeed! Certainly! You bet!

Que non !  No way! Certainly not! Not at all!

Que can represent something that was just said:

Que tu crois !(informal) That’s what you think!

Que je le fais tout seul ? C’est absurde ! (You think) I should do it all alone? That’s absurd!

Que can be used instead of inversion with direct speech and certain adverbs:

« Donne-le-moi ! » qu’il me dit (me dit-il)

“Give it to me!” he said

Peut-être qu’il sera là (Peut-être sera-t-il là)

Perhaps he will be there

Apprendre la Langue Française (102e partie): le verbe–falloir (usage et conjugaison au présent)

Source: french.about.com 

Falloir is an irregular impersonal French verb that is better known in its conjugated form: il faut. Falloir means “to be necessary” or “to need.” It is impersonal, meaning that it has only one grammatical person: the third person singular. It may be followed by the subjunctive, an infinitive, or a noun:

Il faut partir.  It’s necessary to leave.
Il faut que nous partions.  We have to leave.
Il faut de l’argent pour faire ça.   It’s necessary to have / You need money to do that.

When falloir is followed by an infinitive or noun, it may be used with an indirect object pronoun to indicate who or what needs whatever comes next:

Il faut manger.   It’s necessary to eat.
Il nous faut manger.   We have to eat.
Il faut une voiture.   It’s necessary to have a car.
Il me faut une voiture.   I need a car.

Falloir is used in a number of expressions, including:

ce qu’il faut – what is needed
Il a bien fallu ! – I/We/They had to!
s’il le faut – if (it’s) necessary
Faudrait voir à voir (informal) – Come on! Come off it!
Il faut ce qu’il faut (informal) – You’ve got to do things right

The impersonal pronominal construction s’en falloir means to be missing or short of something, as in “this action did not occur because something was missing”:

Tu as raté son appel, il s’en est fallu de 10 minutes.    You missed his call by 10 minutes.
Je n’ai pas perdu, mais il s’en est fallu de peu.    I very nearly lost (I didn’t lose, but it was close).

Conjugations
Present tense   il faut
Imperfect   il fallait
Future   il faudra

Apprendre la Langue Française (101e partie): reconnaître les phrases

Source: Berlitz French Grammar Handbook

A sentence is a spoken or written utterance that has a subject and a predicate.  When talking we often say things that are not sentences, but in writing we usually try to use complete sentences.  The way a sentence is put together is known as its syntax.

Generally speaking the subject is the word or phrase whose action or state the sentence is describing.

Le ferry part de Douvres à sept heures. The ferry leaves Dover at seven o’clock.

Nous sommes heureux de partir en vacances. We are happy to be going on vacation.

Il pleut. It is raining.

The verb may be used in a form known as the passive, which means that the subject of the verb, instead of doing the action of the verb, becomes the receiver of the action.

Tous les passagers sont accueillis par l’equipe du bateau. All the passengers are welcomed by the crew of the ship.

Sometimes the subject is omitted but understood. This happens in command forms.

Prenez vos places dans le restaurant, s’il vous plaît.  Take your places in the restaurant, please.

The predicate consists of the whole of the rest of the sentence, excluding the subject. It must have at least a main verb, that is, a verb in one of the simple tenses. This verb agrees with the subject; that is its form changes to match the subject.

Le bateau arrive. The ship arrives.

Les passagers regagnent leurs voitures. The passengers return to their vehicles.

However, most predicates have more than the minimum requirement of a main verb.

Les passagers regagnent leurs voitures avec impatience. The passengers return to their vehicles impatiently.

There are three types of complete sentence:

  • statements, which are the basic form;
  • direct questions;
  • commands.

All three types must have a main clause; they may also have any number of subordinate clauses.

A main clause is the key grammatical element of a sentence to which any other parts are connected. It can often stand by itself, though of course it may not make much sense on its own.  The main clause does not necessarily open the sentence, though it often does.

Les Robinson cherchent une boulangerie. The Robinsons look for a bakery.

vis-à-vis

Une fois qu’ils sont sortis du port, les Robinson ont cherché une boulangerie, parce qu’ils adorent le pain français. Once they are out of the clock area, the Robinsons look for a bakery, because they love French bread.

A subordinate clause is always dependent on a main clause, whose meaning it completes or expands. It is linked to the main clause by one of three types of word:

  • a subordinating conjunction (such as une fois que and parce que);
  • a question word, such as (where), pourquoi (why), quand (when), or combien (how much); and
  • a relative pronouns such as qui (who/which), or que (whom/which).

John Robinson demande à un passant où se trouve la boulangerie la plus proche. John Robinson asks a passerby where the nearest bakery is.

Le passant, qui habite le quartier, donne les indications au visiteur anglais.  The passerby, who lives in the neighborhood, gives directions to the English visitor.

Apprendre la Langue Française (100e partie): le verbe–devoir (usage et conjugaison au présent)

Source: french.about.com

Devoir is one of the most common French verbs. It is irregular in conjugation and has a number of different meanings related to concepts like obligation and probability.

1. Obligation and necessity

    Dois-tu étudier ce soir ?
    Do you have to study tonight?
    Elles doivent manger.
    They must / need to eat.

2. Probability and supposition

    Il doit rentrer avant le dîner
    He should / will probably be back before dinner
    Nous devons gagner plus cette année
    We should earn more this year.
    Elle doit être à l’école
    She must be at school

3. Expectation and intention

    Je devais aller avec eux
    I was supposed to go with them.
    Il devait le faire, mais il a oublié
    He was supposed to do it, but he forgot

4. Fatalism and inevitability

    Il devait perdre un jour
    He had to / was bound to lose one day
    Elle ne devait pas l’entendre avant lundi
    She wasn’t to hear it until Monday

Translating devoir
Devoir can be translated by should, must, ought to, have to, supposed to – the distinction between necessity and probability is not always clear:

    Je dois faire la lessive
    I should/must/have to do the laundry
    Il doit arriver demain
    He is supposed to / should / has to arrive tomorrow

To specify “must” rather than “should,” add a word like absolument or vraiment:

    Je dois absolument partir
    I really have to go
    Nous devons vraiment te parler
    We must speak to you

To specify “should” rather than “must,” use the conditional:

    Tu devrais partir
    You should leave.
    Ils devraient lui parler
    They should talk to him.

To say that something that “should have” happened, use the conditional perfect of devoir plus the infinitive:

    Tu aurais dû manger
    You should have eaten.
    J’aurais dû étudier
    I should have studied.

Devoir as a transitive verb
When used transitively (and thus not followed by a verb), devoir means “to owe”:

    Combien est-ce qu’il te doit ?
    How much does he owe you?
    Pierre me doit 10 francs
    Pierre owes me 10 francs

Conjugations
Present tense

    je dois
    tu dois
    il doit
    nous devons
    vous devez
    ils doivent