Coffee Reads of the Week – not so perfect


Some of the articles I enjoyed reading over the net are worth sharing, too. Check out my weekly posts via the Coffee Reads series. I’ve got my google reader to back me up so do also check out my shared reads. Enjoy!

relationships: 10 Ways to Make Your Marriage Divorceproof by Samantha Bee and Jason Jones
For starters, no public squawking at each other. Read on for a few more smart (and funny) suggestions from these happily wed comedians: Realize that if you can agree on what constitutes a clean room, you can agree on anything. If you are irritated by your partner, imagine him as a small child. No fistcuffs in public. Marry someone with a backbone who appreciates you that you possess one of your own. Procrastinate. Accept that everybody needs alone time. If you have to fight, walk and fight. Let your spouse in on 90 percent of your day-to-day routine. When you buy gifts for each other, give them at least a full minute of thought.

health & fitness4 Reasons We Slack Off From Exercising by Jenny Everett
Getting to the gym is a hassle — and nearly impossible with your crazed schedule! You’re utterly exhausted. You haven’t seen results and you’re frustrated. You’re bored with your routine.

beauty: From Kitchen Cabinet to Medicine Cabinet – 9 Beauty Substitutes You Already Have
Honey and sugar and mint, oh my! Author and beauty expert Barbara Hannah Grufferman shares how pantry staples could stand in for your beauty standy-bys.

home tips: New uses for lemons
Lighten hair, brighten clothes, soothe sore throat—the secret talents of this citrus staple.

health & fitness: Being imperfect could save your life by Leah Zerbe
Constantly striving to live a faultless life increases your risk of a very imperfect outcome—early death. Experts specializing in perfectionism recently convened at an Association for Psychological Science Convention in Boston to present research looking at perfectionism and its effects on health, ranging from loss of self-esteem and resilience to increased stress and risk of death. It can even interfere with effectively dealing in a crisis situation. “Even though these impossibly high standards are self-imposed, the true perfectionists find it hard to relinquish the high self-expectations of performance, or to settle for more realistic standards, even during times of severe emergencies requiring them to act fast,” explains Prem Fry, PhD, professor of psychology at Trinity Western University in British Columbia. 

health & fitness: The number one way to improve your memory by Piper Weiss
Memory loss is the single biggest fear for Americans over the age of 55. And it’s understandable: over 4 million currently suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, and those numbers are expected to quadruple by 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Foundation. That may be why products promising to improve your brain function are flooding the market. Sudoku and crossword puzzles are said to improve memory association skills, though critics believe only when put to task by those puzzles. Ginkgo infused soft drinks line the grocery aisle, ever since the root was suggested to combat dementia (it doesn’t). Even celery has been loosely linked to mental acuity. But the truth is there’s not enough hard evidence that any of these things really work.

health & fitness: 12 Little Instant Health Boosts by Alyssa Shaffer
Giggle. Brush and floss. Brew a pot of tea. Pen a thank-you note. Hide your TV remote. Doodle during work meetings. Keep your doctor on speed dial. Squeeze your husband’s hand. Strike a warrior pose. Grill some fish for dinner. Drink milk at breakfast. Pour a glass of Pinot.

finance: 25 Self-Made Millionaires have these 7 things in common by Alyson Shontell
Nick Tart and his business partner are only 22, but they’ve already become experts in Generation-Y entrepreneurship. After interviewing 25 self-made 6-figure+ teenage entrepreneurs, the pair authored the book: 50 Interviews: Young Entrepreneurs, What It Takes To Make More Than Your Parents. What they found is that all the entrepreneurs shared a lot of similar traits. These kids were lemonade stand sellers on steroids, hustling classmates in elementary school and staying in on weekends to work on their businesses. Here is what separated these successful teens from their other, ordinary classmates. Here are 7 traits the self-made, teenage millionaires share.

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