The Chemistry of Great Coffee


Coffee that’s not rot gut is called specialty coffee in the industry, which means a higher grade of bean is used and the roasting and brewing is treated as a “craft.”

Source: LiveScience.com

High-end coffee is suddenly seeping into fast-food restaurants faster than you can ask for fries with that.

McDonald’s started offering organic coffee roasted by Green Mountain Coffee Roasters at 650 locations in New England and Albany, New York, this month. Burger King now lets you order coffee brewed one cup at a time, so you avoid that burnt taste.

The fast food chains are acknowledging America’s love affair with quality java.

Coffee that’s not rot gut is called specialty coffee in the industry, which means a higher grade of bean is used and the roasting and brewing is treated as a “craft.”

In 2004, 16 percent of U.S. adults drank specialty coffee daily, according to the Specialty Coffee Association of America. This slice of the market, which involves cafes, kiosks, coffee carts and retail roasters, at a total of 17,400 locations, amounted to $8.96 billion by the end of 2003.

The United States imports and consumes more coffee than any other country.

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